[ speak to me in the light of the dawn ]

An excerpt from the second essay in the series Taking Captive Every Thought by Dr. Cameron Riviere:

“Who is the earliest Christian author you have ever read? If your answer is someone earlier than C. S. Lewis, or, at the outermost, Oswald Chambers, your reading is uncommonly broad. We as a church are almost solely interested in reading the works of our contemporaries. We would benefit from a change in our habits. My point here is not to derogate popular authors such as Dr. Swindoll, Dr. Stanley, and Mr. Lucado, but when these are all the Christian stores offer, when “Christian classics” means the works of C. S. Lewis, when someone looking for a book by Martin Luther has to go to Borders Books because nothing by Luther is stocked by the local Christian bookseller, something is lacking in the church.

We in the present generation are the heirs of 2000 years of Christian life and faith, lived by the thousands of believers who have gone before us. These, our mothers and fathers in the faith, struggled with the same questions as we do today, fought the same temptations and worldly influences, experienced the same triumphs and failures, and endeavored to comprehend their relationship with the infinite, personal God of the universe just as also we must. They have handed down their wisdom to us in many works of theology and devotion. Do they have nothing to teach us? Are we most likely to correctly interpret the Bible when reading it in isolation from millennia of experience at the same task? Will our generation alone do better than the best minds of twenty centuries of faith? Surely humility forbids us to think so.”

I’m looking for book suggestions. My reading list is dwindling and I’m not particularly excited about anything currently on it. What say you?

Music: Brooke Fraser – “C.S. Lewis Song”

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2 thoughts on “[ speak to me in the light of the dawn ]

  1. Well can I say contemporary ones now?? Safely Home by Randy Alcorn is phenomenal. Also, Religious Affections by Jonathan Edwards is maybe the best book I’ve ever read. The Mortification of Sin by John Owen is good too.

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